Tag Archives: climate change

Earth Hour Classroom Activities and Resources

Earth Hour Classroom Activities and Resources

Earth Hour Classroom Activities and Resources
 

Our actions on climate change will shape the future for our children. It is important to discuss and educate our students about climate change, and how to look after our planet! As Earth Hour comes around again for another year, it provides a great opportunity to spend some time discussing issues of sustainability and why Earth Hour is so important.

What is Earth Hour?

Earth Hour is a worldwide movement for the planet organised by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)The event is held annually to encourage individuals, communities, households and businesses to turn off their non-essential lights for one hour, from 8:30 to 9:30 pm.

Although Earth Hour is not during school time – it is still a great opportunity to talk about why it is needed and to encourage your students to go home with this important message!

To help you engage your students in worthwhile conversations, we’ve collated some excellent resources and activities for Earth Hour 2018.


Global Warming Video for Kids

Show your students this gorgeous video about climate change:

Talk with your students about the things they can do to help save the planet and then talk about Earth Hour.


Classroom Display Activity for Earth Hour

“We’ve Got the Whole World in Our Hands”

Create a display in your classroom using the heart from the Earth Day template.

  1. Students colour in the heart-shaped Earth and cut it out.
  2. They then trace their hands on coloured paper and stick each hand on either side of the heart.

Such a cute way to make it look like the whole world is in their hands!

Encourage your students to write what their pledge to the Earth will be and stick these on your Earth Hour classroom display.

Printable Earth Hour and Sustainability Posters

Use our printable sustainability education posters to display around your classroom. Although Earth Hour is primarily to focus on using less electricity, it’s a fantastic time to educate and hold discussions with your students about the importance of a variety good sustainability practises.


Earth Hour Classroom Activities

Use these gorgeous templates to consolidate your students’ knowledge of how they can help the environment.

Environmental Awareness Flip Book

This Environmental Awareness Flip Book helps your students understand what is good and bad for the environment.

Students will love creating this gorgeous flip book and sorting images of everyday things into what will make the earth happy and what will make the earth sad.

Environmental Awareness Flip Book

They can then colour the images in their new flip book.

Environmental Awareness Flip Book

My Promise to the Earth Activity

In this cute activity, students make a promise to the earth by coming up with four different pledges of what they are going to do to save their environment.

This a great activity to discuss different habits that they can change that will help save the planet.

My Promise to the Earth Student Template

How to use this resource:

  1. Download the My Promise to the Earth Student Template.
  2. Trim the extra section off the left-hand side of the template where it states ‘cut’.
  3. Fold the template along the horizontal fold line.
  4. Cut along the three small vertical dotted lines to create four different flaps.
  5. Students pick four pictures that are linked to their own personal promises and stick each picture on the front of each flip section.
  6. Students write what they promise to do under each of the flaps.
  7. Students can then decorate and stick in their workbooks.

Pictures to assist students in creating four promises to the earth include

  • turning the lights off
  • recycling
  • growing plants
  • riding bikes
  • not composting
  • picking up litter.

 

Source- earth hour classroom activities and resources

4 Simple Tips to Living Ethically

Living a sustainable lifestyle that doesn’t put too much pressure on our environment is really not as hard as it seems. Here are 4 really simple tips for ethical living for the time-stressed, space-constrained individual

Ethical_living_inforgraph

Buy local and in-season

It’s spring time here in Australia! From asparagus to blood oranges and zucchini (oodles of zoodles anyone?), this is when an abundance of fruit and vegetables become available. Buying local and in-season means that the produce travel less distance from the farm to your table so you get the best of what’s available taste-wise and price-wise. Check out our handy guide to fresh seasonal spring produce.

If you want to go a step further, consider starting a compost bin in your backyard to turn all the bits and ends into natural fertiliser.

Recycle

In Australia, we consume around 3 million of single-use coffee pods a day. 95% of these are not recyclable which means they are sent to landfills to sit there forever. While we hope that someday, these coffee pods and takeaway coffee cups will made from biodegradable materials, we can take a stand against this single-use mentality by investing in a reusable coffee cup for our daily brew.

Minimise wastage

Food waste is a big issue not only in Australia but also worldwide. Do you know humans never eat almost 40% of all food? That’s a ridiculous amount given that food insecurity and starvation is a real issue around the globe. The United States are starting to take implement laws to reduce food wastage and hopefully more countries will follow suit.

Buy consciously

Approximately 80 billion garments are produced new every year. Can you imagine the amount of resources needed to create this much garments for the fashion industry? By shopping consciously and buying less, we consume only what we need and nothing more. We suggest fixing stuff instead of dumping them (psst, it’s good for your wallet too).

Any other tips? Share with us in the comments below!

Source: 1 Million Women

Happy Earth Day 2015…!!

Earth day is an annual event celebrated on April 22. It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network  and celebrated in more than 192 countries each year. Even though we should be thankful to earth every day for all the resources, beauty, love and care it has provided us, this day holds a special significance to celebrate and honour the only plant we have.

The earth is battling with various environmental, social and economical problems that have been originated due to human interest, need and greed. There has never been a better time than NOW to start thinking about the mother earth and heal the wound that we have created. It’s time to do something, no matter how big or small, to conserve, protect, or preserve our planet to thrive on for many, many years.

This earth day let’s look upon some of the  beautiful words created for the mother earth:

1 (9)

 1 (4) 

1 (5)

1 (6)

1 (7)

1 (8)

 1 (11)

1 (12)

1 (13)

1 (14)

1 (1) 1 (1)

1 (1) 1 (2)

  Want to know more about Earth Day?

  •  The first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970 where 20 million people gathered in the streets of America to protest the Industrial Revolution.

  • In 2009, the United Nations renamed Earth Day, International Mother Earth Day

  • Senator Gaylord Nelson founded Earth Day in the United States. In recognition of his hard work, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.

  • More than 100 thousand people in China rode their bikes on Earth Day 2012. They did this to save fuel and to reduce the CO2 emissions from vehicles.

  • More than 1 billion people were celebrating Earth Day by 2010, which was Earth Day’s 40th anniversary. More than 180 countries celebrated, and Facebook has become a popular tool to spread the word.

  • Earth Day is meant to show support for protecting the environment

Let’s look at these beautiful video now: 

Some eye opening facts: 

Our small steps towards change can make a big difference:

What are your green acts of kindness this year? Every small act will help heal and take care of the planet earth we call home..!!

How climate change will affect where you live

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change spells out how climate change will affect each part of the world, and what can be done about it. For many regions the IPCC only makes vague predictions, and in some cases the impacts are deeply uncertain.

Here is our rough guide to the main impacts this century, and some tips for coping with them. It is partly based on draft versions of the report’s many chapters, the final text of which will be released within the next two days.

Europe: The south will fry

The Mediterranean looks to be the most threatened part of Europe, because the IPCC expects “multiple stresses and systemic failures due to climate change”.

Energy demand will drop in the rest of Europe, but the increased need for cooling around the Mediterranean will drive up energy costs. Tourism, a key industry, will take a hit from 2050, when holidaymakers are expected to choose northern destinations. Forest fires and heatwaves will increase, crops and vineyards will become less productive, fishery production will decrease and rising seas pose a growing threat.

To adapt, people will need to use energy-efficient cooling technologies to reduce energy demands; insure their assets; plant more diverse crops; and build early warning systems and hard walls to defend against floods.

North America: Shifting water

Rain and storms will move northwards, flooding areas north of New YorkMovie Camera and leaving southern areas short of water. Mexicans will have to do everything they can to preserve water and escape the heat.

Adapting to water deficits is not too hard: the key is increased efficiency. But extra flooding is more problematic, with total costs expected to increase tenfold this century.

The US has the capacity to adapt, but is struggling with misinformation and a lack of political will. Nevertheless, New York is on the right path, raising infrastructure like boilers out of the way of expected floods and trying to capture flood water before it reaches sewers.

Asia: Too much water, too little water

Sea-level rise is the biggest problem facing Asia. Globally, the majority of the people directly affected will be in southern and eastern Asia.

But that is not the only problem. Water scarcity will affect most of Asia, and higher temperatures will lower rice yields in some areas by shortening the growing season. Food production in Russia is under particular threat, and the IPCC estimates that up to 139 million people could face food shortages at least once a decade by 2070.

Countries will need to manage water better: water-saving technologies in irrigation may help. Growing crops that cope with high temperatures can boost yields up to 15 per cent, offsetting much of the almost 20 per cent decline expected by 2100.

Australasia: Extreme unknowns

There is a lot of uncertainty about impacts in Australasia, but some things are clear.

More extreme rainfall and rising sea levels will increase the frequency of devastating floods like those that hit Queensland in 2011. People in some areas will have to move away.

Extreme heat will increase and threaten lives, particularly those of the sick and elderly, and also cause more wildfires.

The Great Barrier Reef will continue to degrade, with warmer and more acidic water bleaching more coral, and greater stress coming from factors like agricultural run-off.

Coping with all this requires early warning systems and response plans. But there is huge uncertainty about how rainfall patterns will change. It may be best to plan for the worst.

Africa: Struggling to cope

The big issue for Africa is food security. Crops and livestock will be affected by flooding, drought and shifts in the timing of rainfall and temperature, but where and how these impacts will be felt is uncertain. There will also be more soil erosion from storms, plus pest and disease outbreaks due to warmer temperatures.

Africa has little capacity to adapt. One of the most pressing problems is simply spreading the word about climate change so people can make informed decisions.

Central and South America: Changing norms

Northern Brazil may lose 22 per cent of its annual rainfall by 2100, while the region around Chile could get a 25 per cent increase.

The drying regions will face food shortages. In northern Brazil, that will affect some of the poorest people. Shrinking glaciers in the Andes also threaten water supplies for some people, and will increase tensions.

Climate change will also bring new diseases to many areas, including water-borne diseases like cholera.

The whole region is relatively poor so will struggle to adapt. The first step is to adapt to the current climate. That includes easing poverty and creating early warning systems for disease outbreaks and bad weather.

Small islands: Sinking and eroding

Unsurprisingly, sea-level rise is one of the biggest threats for small islands, including those in the tropics, the Mediterranean, off Africa, and in the Indian and Pacific oceans. Rising waters will swamp some areas, erode coasts and contaminate sources of fresh water.

Building sea walls can have mixed results. In Barbados, building them protected human assets but led to more erosion elsewhere on the coast. It is sometimes better to use “soft” measures like increasing coastal vegetation to reduce erosion.

If islands are near coral reefs, the inhabitants often rely on the reef ecosystems for their livelihood. Reefs are now threatened by warm seas and acidification. But reducing other pressures, like water pollution and destructive fishing, could help.

Source:  How climate change will affect where you live

Read more:Climate report 2014: Your guide to the big questionsa>”